The Book of Joan by Lidia Yuknavitch

The Book of Joan by Lidia Yuknavitch

The Book of Joan by Lidia Yuknavitch had so much promise. We were drawn in by the idea of strong female characters and maybe a little bit by the idea that this would be a great homage to Joan of Arc. It ends up that it wasn’t. We were both so disappointed by this book that we almost took Bill Gates’s approach and just didn’t write about it. You know the old adage “nothing good to say…”. But we felt like we wanted to create some discourse. Have you read this book? What were your thoughts?

Lincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders

Lincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders

Lincoln in the Bardo and George Saunders has seemingly been all over the place lately. For a while there it seemed I could barely go one day without hearing about it in some form or other. So we picked up a copy to see what all the fuss was about and Wow! the fuss was not disproportionate to the pleasure of reading this book. We both enjoyed it immensely.

Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

We broke some of our weight and volume rules when deciding to purchase Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie but are so glad we did. This book was engrossing and thoughtful and had us both absolutely interested from the beginning to the end. It was well worth carrying it around for a little while.

The L-Shaped Room by Lynne Reid Banks

The L-Shaped Room by Lynne Reid Banks

The L-Shaped Room by Lynne Reid Banks is apparently a classic. Neither of us had heard of it before, but were both intrigued by the subject matter when we came across it at a bookstore in Barcelona. The story follows the months after a young woman discovers she's pregnant and how she now must navigate through the world at a different socio and economic level than before. 

The Sheltering Sky by Paul Bowles

The Sheltering Sky by Paul Bowles

We both had a difficult time reading The Sheltering Sky by Paul Bowles. Not because it's slow and very little happens, but because of the sexism and racism that is rampant throughout the novel. Set in Morocco, this novel is considered a classic and required reading for anybody visiting Morocco.

Heroes of the Frontier by Dave Eggers

Heroes of the Frontier by Dave Eggers

Perhaps we were drawn to Heroes of the Frontier for obvious reasons - it's the tale of a road trip cum self discovery tour after one's life begins to fall apart. The characters and scenery are characteristically fabulous for Dave Eggers. This is an engrossing read and one that we both found hard to put down. 

The Caliph's House by Tahir Shah

The Caliph's House by Tahir Shah

It's sad to say that we only picked up this book because we were without any reading materials toward the end of our time in Morocco. But we're so happy that we did. This was an super quick and enjoyable tale of relocation, trying to learn new customs and sorting one's way through remodeling a huge home in a foreign country. Perhaps it spoke to us because we could sympathize with his struggles based on our time in Morocco too. Whatever the reason; this was a happy surprise.

Two Years, Eight Months and 28 Nights by Salman Rushdie

This was honestly the first novel either of us has read by Salman Rushdie. Previous attempts have failed due to heavy brick like sentences. While the writing style is still the same, this novel seemed more palatable. Maybe because it has to do with the Jinn and we were in the Sahara....

If On a Winter's Night a Traveller by Italo Calvino

If On a Winter's Night a Traveller by Italo Calvino

If On a Winter's Night a Traveler by Italo Calvino is one of the most unique books either of us have read. The books takes you through the strange tale of two readers who buy the newest book by Calvino only to find there's been a printing error. Throughout the tale of trying to determine what's happened to the book, Calvino weaves an intricate web of varying tales without ever completing one. It made for an interesting and entertaining read.